OUTDOORS RADIO POLL S1009

LASTWEEK’S POLL RESULTS

022815_dsore_s1009_pollresponse-s1008

 

Is the Natural Resources Board dead in the water, now, due to Gov. Walker’s budget proposal stripping it of oversight authority over DNR?


COMMENTS

 



THIS WEEK’S POLL 

Conservation Congress Opposes Walker Budget Proposal

021415_dsore_s1007_pollpic-smMADISON — Text of letter Wisconsin Conservation Congress Chairman Rob Bohmann sent to Gov. Walker and State Legislators on Feb. 13:

The Honorable Governor Walker and Wisconsin State Legislators,
With full appreciation for your efforts to bring more efficiency to state government and the public sector, I must respectfully but vehemently disagree with the proposal in the 2015-2017 state budget to remove the policymaking authority from the Natural Resources Board and make them strictly an advisory council. The repercussions of this action will have a significant and adverse effect on our state’s natural resources.
Wisconsin has been widely regarded as the center of the conservation movement. It was renowned conservationists Aldo Leopold, William Aberg, and Haskell Noyes that helped forge the Conservation Act of 1927, which created the Conservation Commission (predecessor of the Natural Resources Board). With great foresight these pioneers of conservation created a unique system to keep conservation and politics separate by creating an independent board, beholden to no one. The Natural Resources Board has successfully operated with its policy-making authority uninterrupted for the past 88 years during which time Wisconsin has continuously been a national leader in environmental protection and wildlife conservation efforts.
Nowhere else in Wisconsin state government do the people of this state have such a direct avenue for input as through the Wisconsin Conservation Congress and the Natural Resources Board. Currently, natural resource policy decisions are made in full view of the public, broadcast online, and with ample opportunity for citizens to provide testimony or written comments. The unsurpassed level of citizen involvement we have in the anagement of our state’s resources is the envy of many other states. This proposed change would take the policy-making authority from the public arena to the political arena. Giving the policy-making authority solely to the department secretary would potentially allow for important natural resource decisions to be made behind closed doors without any public vetting. Any potential gains in efficiency that may result from this proposal do not justify the loss of an open and transparent government. The division of power and citizen involvement is essential for the long-term management of the state’s resources which are held in public trust and belong to all citizens of the state.
The Natural Resources Board and Wisconsin Conservation Congress have been working tirelessly in shaping conservation policies for over 80 years. Eliminating the authority of the Natural Resources Board and making the Conservation Congress advisory to the DNR secretary would undermine this proven system of citizen engagement that so many have worked so hard for and would irreparably mar the legacy we leave for future generations. I respectfully ask that the Natural Resource Board retain their policy-making authority and Conservation Congress remain the citizen advisory body to the board to ensure the continuation of Wisconsin’s rich tradition of citizen involvement in conservation.
Respectfully,
[signature]
Rob Bohmann, Chair
Wisconsin Conservation Congress
Milwaukee Journal Senitnel Sports Show - plan to attend - FEB 27 - MAR 1

 

DSORe POLL S724

Results for POLL s723

Should Wisconsin locate a second elk herd in Jackson County?

YES 75% | NO 10% | MAYBE 15% | UNDECIDED 0% | COMMENTS [6]

INSTANT SURVEY VOTE ON – POLL s724
Do you approve of the proposed framework for a wolf hunting and trapping season?

Take the POLL: VOTE!
OK w/ WI Wolf Hunt & Trap Proposal …???

DNR announces proposed wolf hunting and trapping rule, quotas and permit levels

The question we want to know is WHAT do YOU think of this. Let us know. Take the POLL! VOTE YOUR OPINION


MADISON — Earlier this year the federal government delisted the gray wolf from the endangered species list for the Western Great Lakes Region. This spring, Act 169 was passed by the Wisconsin Legislature and signed by the governor, directing the Department of Natural Resources to develop a wolf hunting and trapping season rule, harvest management zones, harvest quotas, and hunter and trapper permit levels.

“The department is committed to conservation of wolves in Wisconsin. Long-term conservation includes managing this important wildlife population within our borders,” said DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp.

DNR has had an approved wolf management plan [PDF] since 1999. That plan allows for a wolf harvest when the population exceeds 350. The wolf population first attained that level in 2004. The 2012 winter wolf count estimated a minimum of 815-880 wolves currently in Wisconsin. This exceeds the population for delisting at both the state and the federal level.

DNR biologists have developed a proposal for wolf harvest zones, wolf harvest quotas by zones, wolf hunting and trapping license levels, and other associated rules.

“We are being conservative in establishing quotas,” said DNR Wildlife Ecologist Bill Vander Zouwen.

The goals of the first wolf hunting and trapping season will be to:

  • provide wolf hunting and trapping opportunities
  • begin to move the wolf population toward the established goal of 350
  • monitor, learn and adapt for future seasons

“Harvest quotas are expected to move the wolf population downward, but are cautious as we seek to evaluate the impacts of the first season,” said Vander Zouwen.

Harvest proposal

The department is looking for feedback on a preliminary proposed range of harvest quotas totaling between 142 and 233 wolves.

Chippewa tribes may make a declaration of up to 50 percent of the final quota within the Ceded Territory. The department has begun and will continue consulting with the tribes in developing these rules.

The proposed number of state hunting and trapping licenses assumes a 20 percent success rate which equals five times the final quota. Harvest zones would be closed to hunting and trapping when the quota is approached in each zone. License holders could hunt in any zone.

The proposed wolf zones are intended to manage for a sustainable wolf population and will take into account areas of the state that may be more or less suitable for wolves.

READ MORE…

For more information Contact

  • Bill Vander Zouwen – 608-266-8840
  • Tom Hauge – 608-266-2193

NEXT WEEK: Results for POLL s724

Do you approve of the proposed framework for a wolf hunting and trapping season?

YES 69.6% | NO 21.7% | MAYBE 8.7% | UNDECIDED 0% | COMMENTS [6]